You May Also Like

Well+Good - These 6 things will *actually* make you happy, according to science

These 6 things will *actually* make you happy, according to science

This essential oil could be a lifesaver in fighting superbugs

This essential oil can take on superbugs (and it’s probably already in your pantry)

How to have awkward conversations

This is *exactly* what to say during the most awkward conversations

Magnesium supplement types

What you need to know before buying a magnesium supplement

girl with eyes closed

13 ways to get rid of under-eye bags and dark circles—without products

These vegan ground-beef tacos are gluten-free

Taco night just got a lot healthier thanks to a surprising gluten-free, vegan meat recipe

Is your post-eclipse headache a big deal? Here’s what you need to know


Thumbnail for Is your post-eclipse headache a big deal? Here’s what you need to know
Pin It
Photo: Stocksy/Sean Locke

Across the country yesterday, everyone and their dogs went outside to catch a glimpse of the first total solar eclipse in the country since 1979. But it wasn’t all painless. Immediately following the eclipse, there were spikes in Google searches for eclipse-related ailments like “solar eclipse headache,” “seeing spots,” and “eyes hurt.”

If you woke up this morning and had difficulty reading or are seeing blurry or blind spots, consult a doctor immediately.

Damaged retinas are a real side effect of looking at the solar eclipse straight on, but if you started feeling any pain just minutes after getting back indoors, you probably have nothing to worry about. B. Ralph Chou, OD, and president of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, told Time that generally, any symptoms of eye damage wouldn’t start appearing until at least 12 hours after your viewing. However, if you woke up this morning and had difficulty reading or are seeing blurry or blind spots, you should consult a doctor immediately.

If your vision is normal but you’re experiencing headaches, you’re probably A-okay, experts say. Being outside, staring at the sun, using vision distorting glasses, and squinting can cause the discomfort that you’re mistaking for your post-eclipse retinal damage. So step away from your computer—no good tends to come from internet self-diagnosing.

There are still a couple of weeks left this month—here’s what to expect, according to your horoscope. And for good astrological measure, check out this eclipse-specific zodiac rundown.

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

How to have awkward conversations

This is *exactly* what to say during the most awkward conversations

These vegan ground-beef tacos are gluten-free

Taco night just got a lot healthier thanks to a surprising gluten-free, vegan meat recipe

Elizabeth Chambers Hammer uses papaya exfoliant

Elizabeth Chambers Hammer credits an exfoliating, tropical fruit for her constant glow

girl with eyes closed

13 ways to get rid of under-eye bags and dark circles—without products

The rise of ethical non-monogamy

How the rise of ethical non-monogamy can make us *all* happier

How to live your best summer life, according to your zodiac sign

How to live your best summer life, according to your zodiac sign