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This body scrub made of meteor dust is the skin treatment you need for the eclipse


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Graphic: Abby Maker for Well+Good

Next week is one of the more exciting occurrences in terms of astronomical phenomena—the solar eclipse is taking place. And whether you’re traveling to the most mesmerizing locales for viewing it, buying special sunglasses, or preparing for a certain political figure’s possible downfall, chances are you’re not thinking about how it’ll affect your beauty routine.

And it won’t, necessarily. But today, a tantalizing iridescent package appeared on my desk—and inside was black “Meteor Shower” scrub from the Australian brand Blaq. And let me tell you, they really mean it with that name.

“Formulated with actual meteorite dust from outer space (yes—really), [it] is filled with tiny fragments of matter from the cosmos.”

“Formulated with actual meteorite dust from outer space (yes—really), Blaq’s Meteor Shower Scrub is filled with tiny fragments of matter from the cosmos,” it states on the press sheet. Okay—color me intrigued. The best part? You can actually look up exactly where your bag of galaxy dust came from by typing in your unique code (on the back of the package) onto the website. (Mine hails from Canyon Diablo, AZ, and fell between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago, NBD.)

Before you finish rolling your eyes wondering how one could possibly gather stardust for the sake of beauty, here’s the deal. “The meteorites are collected around the world and then sourced for use in cosmetic application,” the brand said in a statement. “Blaq’s meteorites fall from the skies and are collected by nomads or meteorite hunters. Once sourced, they are tested and formulated into ‘AC Meteorite Powder,’ which is very stable.” So in case you’ve ever wondered, meteor dust is A-okay for your natural beauty routine.

Also in the galaxy-sourced body scrub are sea salt flakes, activated charcoal, and sugar, so it’s sure to slough that outer layer of dead skin and rejuvenate your complexion (not to mention the extra helping of outer-space powers). Next stop: an otherworldly glow.

In other galaxy news, Mercury is in retrograde right now—but here’s why that can be a good thing. And this is your August energy horoscope (plus spirit animals)

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