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Working out can save you $2,500 a year


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Are those $35 spin classes actually a bargain? A new study sheds new light on your health, financial and otherwise.

Think the activewear trend and boutique fitness boom have made working out too expensive? Good news—a new study finds that people who work out can save up to $2,500 a year in future medical costs.

According to the New York Times, a study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association tried to determine the cost of being active vs. being inactive, in annual health care spending.

Research shows that a sedentary lifestyle is linked to illnesses like heart disease, Alzheimer’s, strokes, and more. And when you look at the cost of treatment for those health conditions, $35 for a spin class now may actually save you thousands down the line.

Following 26,239 American men and women, the researchers pulled data from a previous study on how much they spent on health care on average, and divided them into two groups: those who did or did not meet national exercise guidelines, which recommend that you work out moderately for 30 minutes five times per week.

Then, they looked at how much each person had spent on health care in 2012 and whether being physically active was correlated with lower costs (spoiler alert: it was, significantly).

The researchers found that, on average, a person who met the exercise guidelines—or exceeded them—paid $2,500 less in annual health care expenses than someone who did not.

To help narrow in the results, this study only focused on cardiovascular health, however Khurram Nasir, MD, a preventive cardiologist at Baptist Health South Florida hospital in Miami—who oversaw the study—believed the savings would be even higher across all health care categories.

So next time you think of skipping a workout—just think of the long-term savings! You might not only be saving your life, but your wallet too.

Need inspiration? Meet the 86-year-old nun who is the world’s oldest triathlete. And if it’s tough to book workouts into your busy schedule, here’s how to never waste time during a workout again.

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