You May Also Like

The official Blake Lively workout plan

The official Blake Lively workout, straight from her trainer

Hairnets are key to Kate Middleton hairstyles

Kate Middleton uses this ballerina-chic accessory to preserve a flawless day-2 updo

Avozilla avocados in Australia are 5x larger

Kettlebell-size avocados are here to prove that sometimes, size *totally* matters

avocado hacks

Avocado hacks: 5 expert tips for buying, opening, and storing the trendiest fruit

These vegan ground-beef tacos are gluten-free

Taco night just got a lot healthier thanks to a surprising gluten-free, vegan meat recipe

Meat-free is now a WeWork sustainability policy

WeWork’s latest eco-friendly move is becoming a totally meat-free organization

Why you should throw away every diet book you own


Alicia Silverstone The Kind Diet
Silverstone's "Kind Diet" may be unkind to you

“There are so many fad diets out there,” says certified health coach Brandi Molitor. “And none of them take a person’s age, gender, ethnicity, blood type, or metabolism into consideration.”

Enter bio-individuality, a thought-provoking yet painfully obvious theory that’s finally getting its due. At its core, bio-individuality recognizes that one person’s nourishing food is another person’s poison. The theory, first put forth by Roger Williams in his 1956 book Biochemical Individuality, is only now garnering broad attention after being embraced by forward-looking, holistic-leaning institutions like the Institute for Integrative Nutrition.

Brandi Molitor, 31, recommends throwing away your copy of Skinny Bitch

So while Alicia Silverstone proselytizes a vegan diet as a panacea for all health problems (“Your skin will clear! Pounds will melt away! Your energy will improve!”), Molitor and other bio-individuality proponents take a more circumspect approach. “Veganism is great for the environment; I understand where Alicia is coming from in terms of the meat industry and factory farming,” says Molitor who was a vegan for over a decade until metabolic testing revealed that she need a lot of protein.

“Just eating soy and tempeh always made me feel a little down. After understanding that my body reacts better to animal protein, I ate organic chicken and had the most amazing reaction—I felt full, happy, and my muscle tone improved.” People with Type A blood types, however, often really flourish on a vegan diet, explains Molitor, “it just comes down to using your own body as a laboratory and figuring out what works for you.”

You can also go about it a bit more scientifically, by seeing a nutrition coach like Molitor and analyzing your ancestry, blood type, and metabolic function. “Chances are if you come from Dutch, English, or Russian stock, being a vegetarian will be a really tough road for you,” say Molitor. Eating a healthier-version of our your ancestor’s diet is often the perfect recipe.

Brandi Molitor Wellness Coaching, 917-446-3631, www.brandimolitor.com

Loading More Posts...

You May Also Like

Ginger Detox

7 surprising, health-boosting uses for fresh ginger

bella hadid

The summer updo that has Jessica Biel, Bella Hadid, and J. Lo’s stamp of approval

These vegan ground-beef tacos are gluten-free

Taco night just got a lot healthier thanks to a surprising gluten-free, vegan meat recipe

avocado digestive intolerances fodmaps allergies

Is your avocado habit behind your gut health issues?

Hairnets are key to Kate Middleton hairstyles

Kate Middleton uses this ballerina-chic accessory to preserve a flawless day-2 updo

Elizabeth Chambers Hammer uses papaya exfoliant

Elizabeth Chambers Hammer credits an exfoliating, tropical fruit for her constant glow